Sports Psychology: How To Build Self-Confidence In Your Self And In Your Child: 4 Tips For Parents, Athletes And Coaches

Sports Psychology:

How To Build Self-Confidence: Four Things Parents, Athletes

And Coaches Need To Know

 

   There are many text books, self-help books, journal articles and magazine

articles on building self-concept, self confidence and self-esteem.  Because

I coach many athletes, I tend to spend a lot of time helping these clients to

to strengthen their self-confidence.

 

     However, believing in one self is useful and important for just about

everyone.  It is important for Barack Obama.  It is important for kids.  And it

is probably important for you.

 

         Over the years, I have studied and developed many strategies and

techniques for helping people to believe in themselves.   When people

feel positively about themselves, they tend to grow and they are better able

to have rich and fulfilling lives.

 

       Dr. Albert Bandura, of Stanford University, identified four components

or life experiences which contribute to building one’s self-confidence.

 

       Mastery Experiences-Having a history of doing well at some event,

some skill or some task can help to grow your confidence in yourself. So, it is useful to remind yourself of times when you felt you mastered some task or some skill.

 

       Vicarious Learning-Seeing someone else who you can relate to do

well at something or succeed at something can help you to believe that

you, too, can succeed.  A child seeing his friend hit a baseball can start

to believe that he can put his bat on the ball with some power too.

 

         Modeling Someone Who Inspires You-When you see someone who

you admire do something well, you can imitate his or her actions.  Watching

a singer perform a song brilliantly can inspire a young artist to do the same

thing.  This “modeling” can help to grow your self-confidence.

 

     Social Persuasion-Receiving encouraging words from a parent, a coach or someone you trust can help you to feel like you can do something successfully.   This, too, can strengthen your self-confidence.

 

       People who do not get any of these kinds of experiences are likely to

have little or no self-confidence. 

 

        So, if you want to build self-confidence in yourself, in someone you

care about or your child, consider facilitating one or all of these kinds

experiences.  If  you do, confidence can build in a short period of time.

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Psychology:

How To Build Self-Confidence: Four Things Parents, Athletes

And Coaches Need To Know

 

   There are many text books, self-help books, journal articles and magazine

articles on building self-concept, self confidence and self-esteem.  Because

I coach many athletes, I tend to spend a lot of time helping these clients to

to strengthen their self-confidence.

 

     However, believing in one self is useful and important for just about

everyone.  It is important for Barack Obama.  It is important for kids.  And it

is probably important for you.

 

         Over the years, I have studied and developed many strategies and

techniques for helping people to believe in themselves.   When people

feel positively about themselves, they tend to grow and they are better able

to have rich and fulfilling lives.

 

       Dr. Albert Bandura, of Stanford University, identified four components

or life experiences which contribute to building one’s self-confidence.

 

       Mastery Experiences-Having a history of doing well at some event,

some skill or some task can help to grow your confidence in yourself. So, it is useful to remind yourself of times when you felt you mastered some task or some skill.

 

       Vicarious Learning-Seeing someone else who you can relate to do

well at something or succeed at something can help you to believe that

you, too, can succeed.  A child seeing his friend hit a baseball can start

to believe that he can put his bat on the ball with some power too.

 

         Modeling Someone Who Inspires You-When you see someone who

you admire do something well, you can imitate his or her actions.  Watching

a singer perform a song brilliantly can inspire a young artist to do the same

thing.  This “modeling” can help to grow your self-confidence.

 

     Social Persuasion-Receiving encouraging words from a parent, a coach or someone you trust can help you to feel like you can do something successfully.   This, too, can strengthen your self-confidence.

 

       People who do not get any of these kinds of experiences are likely to

have little or no self-confidence. 

 

        So, if you want to build self-confidence in yourself, in someone you

care about or your child, consider facilitating one or all of these kinds

experiences.  If  you do, confidence can build in a short period of time.

       For more confidence building tips and some products to help you and your child perform your best, go to www.stayinthezone.com

         For some CD’s and books to help with confidence go to

http://www.stayinthezone.com/products.html

       Feel free to contact me at 888 580-ZONE or at info@stayinthezone.com

      Follow me on Twitter.

Dr. Granat

About Dr. Granat

Since 1978, Dr. Granat has counseled thousands of highly competitive athletes from many different sports. His clients have included golfers, tennis players, bowlers, runners, boxers, baseball players, basketball players, pool players, hockey players, ice skaters, wrestlers, fencers and martial artists. (Satisfied Clients) on this site. Now athletes who are struggling with choking, nervousness, lack of confidence, negative thoughts, self-doubt, lack of energy or concentration problems can get the help they need to excel in their respective sport by phone.
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