Baseball Can Be Great Medicine In This Economy

Baseball Can Be Good Medicine 


     Spring is here.  High school baseball players, college players and town  

teams are about to start their seasons and the major leaguers begin playing 

next week.  

         There has been a lot of controversy and bad press surrounding  

America’s pastime of late. 

            Some fans are upset about the steroid use.  Others are angry about 

the high price of tickets.   And some people are incensed over the off field 

antics among some of  these highly paid athletes. 

         But for many, baseball is a passion.  They associate the game with 

nice weather, hot dogs,  cold beer and with fun outings with their family and  

their friends.   

          Some fans love all the statistics and numbers which surround   

the game.  Batting averages, earned run averages, pitch counts, on base 

percentages seem to fascinate people who love to apply mathematics 

to sports.  

      Others seem to enjoy the strategies and complex decisions that 

managers need to make in almost every game.  When do you take the pitcher 

out?  When do you use the hit and run?  When is the right time to steal? 

Who is the best pitcher to bring in to face a particular hitter?        Others love watching great hitters and great pitchers compete against 

one another.  They can get lost and really escape as they observe this 

kind of battle.  

        Given the state of the economy, there is certainly a need for a good 

diversion,  some fun and some recreation.  

         One of my patients who has some health problems and who recently 

lost his job of  thirty years is an avid baseball fan.  Understandably, he  

has been quite overwhelmed and quite stress out of late.   

          Several weeks ago, he told me he knows he will be feeling better in 

early April.  When I asked him why he explained that the start of the 

baseball season always puts him in a good mood.  He said, “It slows  

everything down for me.  It relieves stress and I know that good weather is 

on its way after opening day.  When a great hitter comes up to bat,  

everything seems to stop.  There is a sense of quiet and peace within me as 

I watch his at bat.   For me baseball is very good therapy.” 

Jay P. Granat, Ph.D. is a Psychotherapist in River Edge, NJ.  He is the founder of

He is also the author of 101 Ways To Break Out Of A Hitting Slump







Dr. Granat

About Dr. Granat

Since 1978, Dr. Granat has counseled thousands of highly competitive athletes from many different sports. His clients have included golfers, tennis players, bowlers, runners, boxers, baseball players, basketball players, pool players, hockey players, ice skaters, wrestlers, fencers and martial artists. (Satisfied Clients) on this site. Now athletes who are struggling with choking, nervousness, lack of confidence, negative thoughts, self-doubt, lack of energy or concentration problems can get the help they need to excel in their respective sport by phone.
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